Wednesday, May 5, 2010

The Anti-Bankster Revolution- The Greek Front


(Via BusinessInsider)

19 comments:

  1. Greek chicks in handcuffs... sexy!

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  2. bravo ELLAS eparhoun andres me arxidia

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  3. That redhead is nice!

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  4. At least I can say CREEK men and women have a back bone unlike you ugly filthy AmeriKKKan pussies.

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  5. Oh, don't worry Falesteeni. Our economy hasn't quite tanked like Greece has . . . yet. Once our bonds and our economy look like Greece's THEN come talk to us about fascism. Then things'll get REALLY interesting. And as far as the KKK goes, do realize we have President Obama to 'save us' from our ugly filthy selves. Even if he doesn't have a spine.

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  6. Those "men with spines" are the same ones who beg their Greek mothers to find someone in the government so that they get preferential treatment in the army and then a public sector job where they sit all day scratching themselves.

    They just killed two women (one of them 4-months pregnant) and one man during their protests. And the communist party there declared that they do not support the Greek constitution. Even "banana-republic" would be an upgrade for Greece at this point.

    Nothing to do with banks. Greeks have no idea about economics. "Econ 101" is too much for them.

    And it's not a European country. It's a Balkan country. Modern Greeks have nothing to do with Europe.

    Yes, I'm a native Greek, yes I'm in the US now, yes I lived in Greece for 29 years, and yes I worked in three different sectors there. And what the others say, let them say it to their clueless friends, not to me. I've been there, I know our "little secrets". It's a very low-level country, courtesy of its corrupted politicians and perhaps the most stupid and clueless youth in the western world. They think that they gained knowledge because they got "internet".

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  7. I am Canadian and I believe that the Greeks are the first Front that is going to happen to the financial decrepide barons who tell us what to do. Well the times are a changing and the people are about to tell the barons it is time to TAKE A HIKE. Good on you Greece. Stand for the people! We will overcome!

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  8. letteris...... this has everything to do with the BANKS, pull your head from your ass.And the deaths of those people is truly sad, but the blame for their loss of life lies solely at the feet of the politicians and the bankers

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  9. Pics of cops on fire is always funny.

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  10. Ever notice that police everywhere (OK almost everywhere) are actually called some form of recognizable derivative of P-O-L-I-C-E. NWO brown shirts.

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  11. How does firebombing a local bank relate to a revolution against the bankers, corporations and the politicians the bankers and corporations control? I see no relationship at all.
    Cowards don't murder innocent people,
    Heros go head to head with the peratrator of the evil.
    What do you expect the Parliament to do differently? Arrest the Church Patriarch and demand money? Go after corporations, investors and criminals that have pulled their money out of Greek banks to avoid paying taxes? Then stand up for what you want with courage, not hiding behind kerchiefs and unintelligible, illogically reasoned ideology.
    Who are you? Have you been fighting against private universities in Greece which would provide Greeks jobs and help the Greek economy?
    Tell us the details - which part of the austerity plan would you change - and how? The austerity plan cuts salaries based on amount - if you make more money; your cut is deeper.
    Lefteris is correct when talking about the character of these "anarchists."
    I immigrated here from the USA a dozen years ago.
    There are portions of the population that are European and involved with positive changes for the Greek environment, education and economy.
    But these weren't the people nor students protesting just to protest authority, they were working that day for a progressive, successful Greek nation.

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  12. Lefteris, as Anon 10:40 PM says, it's everything to do with banks, and the whole world is slowly coming to understand by means of the internet - being the only medium the banks haven't figured out how to control, that it is both the legalised counterfeiting and the expectation that borrowers find the money - which has not been issued, to pay the interest on loans.

    Which is what is bringing it to a head seemingly everywhere now, for when private banks lend to govts the debt becomes right there unpayable because the interest charged has not also been issued; the solution to that problem has been to borrow more from the private banks to pay the interest, which over the long term - now coming to an end, is a runaway compounding debt, and this tottering edifice is now swaying.

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  13. Lefteris, as Anon 10:40 PM says, it's everything to do with banks, and the whole world is slowly coming to understand by means of the internet - being the only medium the banks haven't figured out how to control, that it is both the legalised counterfeiting and the expectation that borrowers find the money - which has not been issued, to pay the interest on loans.

    Which is what is bringing it to a head seemingly everywhere now, for when private banks lend to govts the debt becomes right there unpayable because the interest charged has not also been issued; the solution to that problem has been to borrow more from the private banks to pay the interest, which over the long term - now coming to an end, is a runaway compounding debt, and this tottering edifice is now swaying .

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  14. Greeks would be wise to get out of the EU.
    Kick out the IMF, World bank, and...EU central bank.
    Scatter the elite banking cartels to the wind.
    And outlaw fractional reserve banking.
    Return to sound money backed by gold or something.
    How things are set up now, rich fat cats look at countries like candy stores...destroy all private property rights and take whatever they please. Leaving the natives as mere serfs in their homeland.

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  15. All long-term credit cycles end with asset (or commodity) crashes in the markets of the leading economy; the world follows and the world today is in the throes of a huge depression from the last asset crash.

    Socially, and very sadly, what is happening is exactly what happened during the Great Depression of the 30s - Huge transfers of the wealth created and held in savings, property and pension funds by the working and middle classes was transfered to the already rich leaving huge numbers of penniless unemployed.

    These transfers occur largely through bankruptcies and foreclosures from which banks emerge the owners of vast tracts of land, businesses and property, sometimes entire nations, like Greece right now.

    Greece and the other PIIG nations, as well as many others, "foolishly over borrowed" from the World Bank and the IMF and found themselves in a largely anticipated debt trap.

    Surely there is something very wrong with a banking system whose customers - all of them, individuals and nations - end up bankrupt?

    The Bailout of Greece, "The squeezing of Greece is to take the forms made familiar over the past disastrous decades by the International Monetary Fund: the Greek state is enjoined to cut public expenses, which means firing public employees, cutting their overall earnings, delaying retirement, economizing on health care, raising taxes, and incidentally probably raising the jobless rate from 9.6 per cent to around 16 per cent, all with the glorious aim of bringing the deficit down to 8.7 per cent this year and thus appeasing the invisible gods of the (banker's) market." - Dianna Johnstone, Global Research.

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  16. Oh, and bugger the people ...

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  17. Jct: An anti-bankster (accounting) revolution with firebombs won't work. My anti-bankster revolution involves reprogramming bank software to restrict their computers computers to a pure service charge and the interest-charge abolished. Wouldn't interest-free bank accounts send those protestors home? Fighting with police is really going to reform banking? They've got the debt slaves chasing the wrong guys.

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  18. The Greek riot squads seem ill equipped. In countries where rioting is a popular hobby like Israel and Korea the riot squads all wear a 1 kg fire extinguisher holstered on their belt. Some have runners keeping them stocked up with replacements as they are used. Molotov cocktails are thus a waste of time and trouble and soon disappear.
    There is also a nasty trick out there in riot squad land. Hit the guy with the burning bottle with a rubber bullet as he's getting ready to throw. The result is fresh roasted rioters. It speedily results in fire free riots.

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  19. I would bet money that the firebombing of the bank was a false-flag operation intended to bring the protests into disrepute. That's how the psychopathic gangster banking families work. 9/11 was only one example, albeit the most dramatic, of the way they work. They want to enslave the world.

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